10 Bold, Adventurous Books That Will Feed Your Hunger for Wanderlust

Entice and feed your hunger for wanderlust, don’t suffocate it. Devour images, reviews, languages, and books that depict scenery, landscapes, and adventure. Take home quenching collections that offer a glimpse into the world of vacations and getaways: beaches, mountaintops, and rolling hills. Each coast and every coast offers unique quality, unique culture, and unique history that’s pointedly different than any every other place. Whether illustrating the wild, the arctic, and other far off places, some books beautifully capture these experiences.

The allure of travel is that it’s a practice in escapism; it’s a journey, a voyage, and an awakening. It’s the geographical leap from destination to destination, executed by train, boat, automobile, bicycle, foot, airplane, or other means. Originating from the Old French word, travail, motivations for travel vary; tapping a need for discovery, exploration, cultural interests, relaxation, pleasure, and the nurturing of interpersonal relationships. No matter what gets you to search locally, regionally, domestically, or internationally, prepare yourself. Thumb through written works that will nurture that traveller’s spirit.

Read on to browse the names of ten inspiring travel books that speaks to the nomad in you.

 

The Unbearable Lightness of Being“The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” by Milan Kundera: “A young woman in love with a man torn between his love for her and his incorrigible womanizing; one of his mistresses and her humbly faithful lover—these are the two couples whose story is told in this masterful novel. In a world in which lives are shaped by irrevocable choices and by fortuitous events, a world in which everything occurs but once, existence seems to lose its substance, its weight. Hence, we feel “the unbearable lightness of being” not only as the consequence of our pristine actions but also in the public sphere, and the two inevitably intertwine.”


“The Alchemist,” by Paulo Coelho: ““The Alchemist,” by Paulo Coelho

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho continues to change the lives of itsreaders forever. With more than two million copies sold around the world, The Alchemist has established itself as a modern classic, universally admired.

Paulo Coelho’s masterpiece tells the magical story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure as extravagant as any ever found.

The story of the treasures Santiago finds along the way teaches us, as only a few stories can, about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, learning to read the omens strewn along life’s path, and, above all, following our dreams.”


“The Turk Who Loved Apples,” by Matt Gross: “While writing his celebrated Frugal Traveler “The Turk Who Loved Apples,” by Matt Grosscolumn for the New York Times, Matt Gross began to feel hemmed in by its focus on what he thought of as “traveling on the cheap at all costs.” When his editor offered him the opportunity to do something less structured, the Getting Lost series was born, and Gross began a more immersive form of travel that allowed him to “lose his way all over the globe”—from developing-world megalopolises to venerable European capitals, from American sprawl to Asian archipelagos. And that’s what the never-before-published material in The Turk Who Loved Apples is all about: breaking free of the constraints of modern travel and letting the place itself guide you. It’s a variety of travel you’ll love to experience vicariously through Matt Gross—and maybe even be inspired to try for yourself.”


“Love With a Chance of Drowning,” by Torre DeRoche : “City girl Love with a Chance of DrowningTorre DeRoche isn’t looking for love, but a chance encounter in a San Francisco bar sparks an instant connection with a soulful Argentinean man who unexpectedly sweeps her off her feet. The problem? He’s just about to cast the dock lines and voyage around the world on his small sailboat, and Torre is terrified of deep water. However, lovesick Torre determines that to keep the man of her dreams, she must embark on the voyage of her nightmares, so she waves good-bye to dry land and braces for a life-changing journey that’s as exhilarating as it is terrifying.”


“Vagabonding,” by Rolf Potts

“Vagabonding,” by Rolf Potts: “There’s nothing like vagabonding: taking time off from your normal life—from six weeks to four months to two years—to discover and experience the world on your own terms. In this one-of-a-kind handbook, veteran travel writer Rolf Potts explains how anyone armed with an independent spirit can achieve the dream of extended overseas travel. Now completely revised and updated, Vagabonding is an accessible and inspiring guide to

• financing your travel time
• determining your destination
• adjusting to life on the road
• working and volunteering overseas
• handling travel adversity
• re-assimilating back into ordinary life ”


“The Art of Travel,” by Alain de Botton“The Art of Travel,” by Alain de Botton: “Any Baedeker will tell us where we ought to travel, but only Alain de Botton will tell us how and why. With the same intelligence and insouciant charm he brought to How Proust Can Save Your Life, de Botton considers the pleasures of anticipation; the allure of the exotic, and the value of noticing everything from a seascape in Barbados to the takeoffs at Heathrow. Even as de Botton takes the reader along on his own peregrinations, he also cites such distinguished fellow-travelers as Baudelaire, Wordsworth, Van Gogh, the biologist Alexander von Humboldt, and the 18th-century eccentric Xavier de Maistre, who cataloged the wonders of his bedroom. The Art of Travel is a wise and utterly original book. Don’t leave home without it.”


The Good Girl's Guide to Getting Lost: A Memoir of Three Continents, Two Friends, and One Unexpected Adventure “A Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost,” by Rachel Friedman: “Rachel Friedman has always been the consummate good girl who does well in school and plays it safe, so the college grad surprises no one more than herself when, on a whim (and in an effort to escape impending life decisions), she buys a ticket to Ireland, a place she has never visited. There she forms an unlikely bond with a free-spirited Australian girl, a born adventurer who spurs Rachel on to a yearlong odyssey that takes her to three continents, fills her life with newfound friends, and gives birth to a previously unrealized passion for adventure.”  


Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail“Wild,” by Cheryl Strayed: “At twenty-two, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother’s death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life. With no experience or training, driven only by blind will, she would hike more than a thousand miles of the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State—and she would do it alone. Told with suspense and style, sparkling with warmth and humor, Wild powerfully captures the terrors and pleasures of one young woman forging ahead against all odds on a journey that maddened, strengthened, and ultimately healed her.”


“The Blue Sky,” by Galsan Tschinag“The Blue Sky,” by Galsan Tschinag: “In the Altai Mountains of northern Mongolia, the nomadic Tuvan people’s ancient way of life is colliding with the relentless influence of the modern world. For a young shepherd boy, the confrontation comes in stages. First, his older siblings leave to attend a distant boarding school. Then, his beloved grandmother dies, taking with her a profound link to the tribe’s traditions and their connection to the land. But the cruelest blow is struck when his dog — “all that was left to me” — dies after eating poison the boy’s father set out to protect the herd from wolves. In despair, he begs the Heavenly Blue Sky for answers but is met with only the mute wind. Tschinag, the first and only member of the Tuvan to use a written language to tell stories, weaves a lyrical account of his people and their traditions.”

 


Life of Pi“Life of Pi,” by Yann Martel: “The son of a zookeeper, Pi Patel has an encyclopedic knowledge of animal behavior and a fervent love of stories. When Pi is sixteen, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger. Soon the tiger has dispatched all but Pi, whose fear, knowledge, and cunning allow him to coexist with Richard Parker for 227 days while lost at sea. When they finally reach the coast of Mexico, Richard Parker flees to the jungle, never to be seen again. The Japanese authorities who interrogate Pi refuse to believe his story and press him to tell them “the truth.” After hours of coercion, Pi tells a second story, a story much less fantastical, much more conventional–but is it more true?”


Rick Garson is driven by the possibility of innovation and growth in the entertainment industry every day. He has been at the helm of groundbreaking projects, including the famed Billboard Music Awards. Interested in learning more about Rick Garson, entertainment, travel, and entrepreneurship? Please visit RickGarson.com and RickGarson.net!